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Samadhi Meditation: How Can You Achieve it?

by Michael Teh

There are plenty of studies that have been done over half the century to prove the benefits of meditation, however, if you only meditate occasionally, you will not achieve the long-term benefits of meditation. To motivate yourself to meditate regularly, I would highly recommend you take advantage of the most common reason that people take to meditate: the desire to be calmer and less stressed. And once you used this impulse and expand it, it becomes “samadhi meditation”. To find out more on how to achieve samadhi meditation, read on further.

“To motivate yourself to meditate regularly, I would highly recommend you take advantage of the most common reason that people take to meditate: the desire to be calmer and less stressed.”

There are plenty of studies that have been done over half the century to prove the benefits of meditation, however, if you only meditate occasionally, you will not achieve the long-term benefits of meditation.

To motivate yourself to meditate regularly, I would highly recommend you take advantage of the most common reason that people take to meditate: the desire to be calmer and less stressed. And once you used this impulse and expand it, it becomes “samadhi meditation”. So, when you can achieve samadhi meditation, instead of taking the usual 10 to 20 minutes out of your schedule to meditate – which most people won’t manage to do so regularly – you will be able to easily reach spontaneous meditation, a meditative state anytime and anywhere you want.

But what technique do you need to apply to reach samadhi meditation? Well, it is rather simple – at any time of the day when you find yourself feeling distracted, overwhelmed, worried, tired or stressed, deal with this imbalanced state immediately.
Here’s what you can do:
i. Find a quiet place and close your eyes
ii. Take a few deep breaths
iii. Place your attention in the lower Dan Tien (2 inch below Navel) and
breathe easily
iv. Continue until you feel calm and centred

The essence of samadhi meditation is frequency and repetition – it is a technique that helps to improve your mind’s tendency to return to a restful, alert state the more frequent you use it. That said, a couple of minutes a few times a day will adapt the nervous system to experience what restful alertness feels like. And the tendency to return to a balanced state will become more automatic. Having that said, in samadhi meditation, not only are you supporting your mind to rebalance, but also uncover the bliss and joy within us, which becomes more necessary in stressful situations and trying times. Hence, it makes meditation a special kind of healing and there are three silent components that come together in meditation which are:
Dharana: Focussed attention, the first stage of meditation
Dhyana: The continuous flow, where the mantra or Qi flows alone with hardly any interruptions
Samadhi: The absorption, the culmination of meditation or beyond meditation

In Sanskrit, the name of these three components when they merged is Samyama – while the term is not important, what you need to know is that silence can be contacted with the touch of an intention, and once the state of restful alertness has been experienced, it begins to deepen with every repetition over time. And through samadhi meditation, you’d begin to see its healing benefits as it helps your active mind to return to its source of pure awareness. Many of us are often in a state called “autonomic overdrive” where our nervous systems are chronically working at the limit of wellness caused by stress, heavy work demands, anxiety and depression. The accumulation of chronic overload is fatal over the long term and it is a good enough reason to retrain our nervous system to be balanced at all times. If you’d like to learn how to achieve this state, allow me to be your guide as you start your meditation journey.

Source: part of the information here is to be credited to chopra.com

Michael Teh, 11th May 2021.